Journey Toward Hope: A History of Blacks in Oklahoma by Jimmie Lewis Franklin

By Jimmie Lewis Franklin

This booklet covers nearly each significant point of black existence in Oklahoma, and environment it except different experiences of blacks within the kingdom is the emphasis the writer supplies to social and cultural advancements withing the black group. the issues of way of life and the fun and pleasures of residing are valuable matters of the booklet, and the writer devotes a lot awareness to the associations that gave energy to existence lower than the procedure of segregation.

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Journey Toward Hope: A History of Blacks in Oklahoma

This e-book covers virtually each significant element of black existence in Oklahoma, and atmosphere it except different experiences of blacks within the kingdom is the emphasis the writer supplies to social and cultural advancements withing the black neighborhood. the issues of way of life and the fun and pleasures of dwelling are important issues of the publication, and the writer devotes a lot cognizance to the associations that gave energy to existence lower than the approach of segregation.

Extra resources for Journey Toward Hope: A History of Blacks in Oklahoma

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Eagleson organized a company at Topeka, Kansas, that actively sought to attract blacks to Oklahoma. The promotional activities of Eagleson and other black boosters greatly resembled those of white promoters, but they also reflected the political, social, and economic plight of blacks in the Deep South during this period. Colonizationists made much of the Oklahoma climate, soil, and resources, but more important, they described Oklahoma as a place where a black could enjoy freedom and could fearlessly exercise his rights as a citizen.

Cheers and shouts from fifty thousand souls ... sent their echoes o'er hill and plain, arousing into life the solitude of the enchanting surroundings. By nightfall the homesteaders in the Run of '89 had outlined the beginnings of Oklahoma Territory, with the majority of the first settlers coming from nearby states or from within Indian Territory. Some, however, journeyed from greater distances. By the end of 1890 the black population of Oklahoma Territory had grown to more than three thousand. Most were concentrated in Kingfisher, Logan, Oklahoma, and Canadian counties, with fewer settling in Payne and Cleveland counties.

Although the story of the founding of Boley may appear apocryphal, there is general agreement that the president of the Fort Smith & Western Railroad urged the town's establishment, and that it took its name in honor of W. H. Boley, who believed in the ability of black people. Booker T. Washington, the noted black leader from the 1890s to his death in 1915, visited the small town founded in 1903 and attempted to capture some of its meaning to black people. In 1908 he wrote that: Boley, like the other negro towns that have sprung up ...

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